Review The Walking Dead Season 2

Written by Twisted Ideas

the-walking-dead-mac-iOS-FSMdotCOMThe second season of Telltale’s critically acclaimed The Walking Dead game has concluded. Clementine’s journey in the post apocalyptic world has come to a close for now… Was this a story worth looking at a second time around?

The_walking_dead_video_game_season_two_promo Developer: Telltale Games

 

 Publisher: Telltale Games

 

 Platforms: Android, iOS, OS X, PC, Playstation 3, Playstation 4, Playstation Vita, Xbox 360, Xbox One,

What do I think?

This review was hard for me to write. I’m mixed on this season. It has its highs and its lows. Those highs however, a few and far in between. This isn’t the emotional roller coaster that season 1 was. The father daughter relationship that made season 1 stand out was gone. This is mostly Clementine’s story; A story about an innocent girl who lost the one person who protected her and helped her adapt to a world gone wrong. Clementine has become more mature, a maturity needed to survive not only the walkers but the people.

Season 2 has rough spots. Clementine gets inserted into a new group of survivors and their dilemmas. We’re quickly introduced to the new group and have their dilemmas catch up to them. This happens every on and it snowballs throughout the season. You may not know what will happen next but its presence is felt.

Exposition aside, I had a few problems with this season. The snowball effect leaves the story in motion so we don’t get many slow moments. The breather moments were the best for developing the group in season one; The most memorable being in episode 2 of season 1 where you had to choose who to feed. These slow moments exist early one but mostly to introduce the group. Most episodes end with one final decision in a climatic cliffhanger rather than taking advantage of something slower and more quiet.

There are too many action. The Walking Dead is known for having main characters die unexpectedly. Where the comics and season one excelled were in its characters. There’s a lot of death but it rarely has any weight. Some people are shot or bit and their deaths are trivial. It reminds me of how the show introduced characters solely to be killed to promote the action. Later in the season when we get to know the characters we get great quiet moments and death with more emotional weight.

Clementine is why we’re here; She’s grown up so much when we first found her in Seattle. She’s a more mature and smart young girl that it’s surprising that she’s still only eleven. It’s more surprising that people but so much responsibility and pressure on her. Clementine is a valued member whose opinion is heard and respective. She’s also blamed for decisions that leads to mistakes. It’s strange because she’s reprimanded more so than the others who sit back doing nothing. This was an interesting dynamic which made me choose silence a lot more than I did with Lee. Clementine is still a child. I didn’t think that she should get involved in every argument with between adults. I felt that she should sit back and listen, to learn from situations without being directly involved.

The 400 Days DLC wasn’t well utilized. One of the five characters was a part of the story while the others just filled in the background. I understand that it would have been difficult to integrate them beyond where we meet them but it still feels like a missed opportunity. If you haven’t played 400 Days you won’t even notice anything is missing, not that anything is gained either.

Should you buy it?

If you’re a fan of Season One then I would recommend Season Two. I don’t think that it’s as good as the first season but it does high points. This is a different kind of story. It won’t leave as big an impact as last time so I don’t know how others will take it. The great writing and the timed decisions return. If that isn’t enough of a hook for you to see Clementine through this season then I don’t what is.

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